History

 

Blue Sky was founded by Peter Degerfeldt and Göran Widenby back in 1984 under strange circumstances.

Two geeks under one parachute!

People often asked if you could save your friend if the parachute doesn't open?

So we have to try and yes, it worked.

Göran climbed up on Peters shoulder, then after and fun joy ride together he jumped off to safety and opened his parachute.

That was how we started in this business, by pure passion for the ultimate picture impossible.

Since then, we worked all over the globe with various projects, from the top of the world on Mount Everest to Antarctica.

In free fall with 300 skydivers, in 9G in the Saab Gripen jetfighter, under the water, BASE jumping from cliffs, etc.

Everything to get get the Impossible Picture.

 

From 2006 I am running the business myself.

Göran is out sailing on the seven seas.

 

The Crazy days

 

In those early crazy days everything was about Skydiving.

We lived and worked with or passion.

We basically jumped off anything that was able to get airborne.

Soon we also learned how to use Mother Nature as a playground when BASE jumping was invented.

More customers realized that they could use our services.

Production companies, the Air Force, the Army, aerobatic flying, hot air ballooning, skiing, sailing, climbing among many action-sports.

 

Higher altitudes

 

1987 was a major breakthrough.

Never in my wildest dreams could I think of to climb  Mount Everest!

Sagarmatha/Chomolungma or "Mother Godess of Earth" as she is called by our Sherpa brothers and Sisters. The Mountain turned out to be a good but strong character and teacher.

In total, I spent 9 months on her slopes. Giving me the whole spectrum of life, good and bad, mostly good though.

The strong friendship with our Sherpas is a life long experience.

Me and my wife are married in a small Sherpa village just south of Mt Everest.

 

Gold Prize

 

Just arriving to the foot of Mount Everest North face in Tibet, I got the news that we won the Nikon Photo Contest!

Good start of the Expedition I thought, but we never made it to the summit that year, only 200 metres was missing.

We learned our lesson and was back 1991 on the notorius Japanese Super Coloir to Hornbein and straight up to the summit.

 

Still only made by 9 people over the history.

 

Lars Cronlund was on the summit on the 20th of May.

Tragedy was close when Lars was lost on the way down, he had to bivouac without any gear and supplemental oxygen at 8 600 metres.

Much to our relief he made it down to safety the next day, what a heck of guy!

 

Fastest way down

 

After spending 3 months on the mountain and more than 25 days above North Col, I decide to have some fun. I flew back home with my parachute from 7000 metres, much to our Sherpa brothers delight.

Not only did I have a fantastic ride ( I should not tell you about the start) but also I guess no one ever had that view of Mt Everest?

I landed safely at 6 500 metres just in time for lunch.